Kevin Anderson topples marathon man John Isner in longest ever Wimbledon semifinal

Kevin Anderson topples marathon man John Isner in longest ever Wimbledon semifinal

After South African Kevin Anderson's shock Wimbledon win over defending champion Roger Federer on Wednesday, one restaurant chain has noticed a unique public relations opportunity. It was a marathon game.

Spare a thought for Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic, whose wait to play their own semifinal finally ended around 8 p.m. local time.

If Kevin Anderson was facing John Isner in the first week of Wimbledon, it's hard to imagine it being played any higher than Court 18 and yet the big-serving duo thrashed it out on Centre Court in the semi-finals.

The match has surpassed the previous record of 4 hours, 44 minutes when the score was tied 9-9 in the deciding set.

In a marathon match on Friday night which was the longest in Wimbledon semifinal history, lasting over five hours on court, Anderson was able to claw back from 2-1 back to seal the victory.

6-4, 26-24 victory that lasted more than six hours, Anderson advances to the Wimbledon Final on Sunday, when he will play the victor of the other semifinal between Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic.


Paulina Dedaj is a writer/ reporter for Fox News.

It was also the second longest match at a Slam, beating the six hours and 33 minutes which Fabrice Santoro spent seeing off Arnaud Clement in the 2004 French Open. Isner beat Mahut: 6-4, 3-6, 6-7 (7), 7-6 (3), 70-68.

In a final set that lasted almost 3 hours, Anderson had break points at 7-7, 10-10 and 17-17 before finally earning the decisive breakthrough to go 25-24 up - drawing a massive roar from the crowd.

Again, the pair traded breaks early in the fourth, but Anderson broke and eventually served it out to take the match into a decider after three hours and 40 minutes. While Isner's match back in 2010 was a fun side note that helped garner interest in the tournament for fans it might not usually reach, to have a never-ending saga played in the semifinal doesn't look great for the sport.

Just before the two-and-a-half hour mark, Anderson produced the first break of the match - the first time someone had broken the Isner serve throughout this tournament.

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