Trump forecasts 'nice' outcome from Kim summit

Trump forecasts 'nice' outcome from Kim summit

US President Donald Trump said on Monday his historic summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in Singapore could "work out very nicely" as officials from both countries sought to narrow differences on how to end a nuclear stand-off on the Korean peninsula.

"The upcoming summit between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un stands a decent chance of success, even though the administration has flouted all the traditional rules of good summit planning", reads the report.

"The entire world is watching the historic summit between (North Korea) and the United States of America", Mr Kim told Mr Lee through an interpreter when they met Sunday.

"I think we're going to have a relationship, and it will start on June 12", Trump said at the time.

Choi Ho-chul, a 73-year-old former bank employee, said he doubts the North would give up nuclear weapons, which he said were a "means to control its population".

The media reports on the Trump-Kim talks on Monday follow months of only the scantest of coverage, though Kim's summits with South Korea's president, Moon Jae-in, and China's president, Xi Jinping, received large-scale coverage soon after they had ended.

Experts on North Korea say that the shortened meeting time leaves nearly no room to forge a path for Pyongyang's "complete, verifiable, irreversible denuclearization", or CVID, which the US State Department was promising just last week.

"North Korea has previously confirmed to us its willingness to denuclearise and we are eager to see if those words prove honest", he said.

That's in part because of South Korea's diplomatic outreach to the North, which was highlighted by two summits this spring between the rivals' leaders.


Trump went from one global leadership summit to another this weekend, leaving the G-7 conference in Canada to fly to Singapore.

Mr. Trump has made clear that his goal is denuclearization.

While advisers say Trump has been reviewing briefing materials, the president insists his gut instincts will matter most when he gets in the room with Kim.

Instead of flying the Pyongyang-Shanghai-Singapore route that takes around six-and-a-half hours but passes over sea, Kim Jong-un flew via Beijing, which took around 10 hours.

The secrecy of the North Korean leader's health is, apparently, paramount. Trump and Kim lookalikes held a summit of their own at a local shopping mall, while one bistro is offering a libation known as the Trump-Kim "Bromance:" Beer, tequila, diet Coke and the Korean distilled rice liquor known as soju. The move was in reaction to North Korea's criticism of U.S. vice president Mike Pence's statement that the country could meet the same fate as Libya if it failed to meet a nuclear deal with the US.

Trump in May briefly scrapped the summit with Kim, only to later reinstate the meeting after meeting withNorth Korea official Kim Yong Chol.

Plans for the meeting almost foundered after Trump abruptly withdrew in May, citing North Korea's "open hostility" during negotiations.

But Trump - for whom a major accomplishment would bolster his position ahead of midterm elections in November - baffled observers when he said he did not think he had to prepare "very much" for the summit.

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