Trump declares North Korea still poses ‘extraordinary threat’

Trump declares North Korea still poses ‘extraordinary threat’

"They stopped shooting missiles over Japan".

THE FACTS: That's not what his Pentagon chief, Jim Mattis, says.

North Korea has singled out Japan, a key USA ally in the region, for verbal attacks, threatening to "sink" the country into the sea and to turn it into "ashes".

North Korea announced before the Singapore summit the suspension of its ICBM testing and also closed its nuclear bomb test site, where it conducted several explosions in front of visiting media that it said were to destroy testing tunnels.

The National Emergencies Act was passed by Congress in 1976 and, as of early December, the U.S.is in a state of 28 ongoing national emergencies, according to Lawfare.

Carroll said in an email that the USA -led U.N. Command was moving "assets" to a US air base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, south of Seoul, and to the Joint Security Area at the border to prepare for the process, but that plans were "still preliminary".

Carroll said in an email that the USA -led U.N. Command was moving "assets" to a US air base in Pyeongtaek, South Korea, south of Seoul, and to the Joint Security Area at the border to prepare for the process.

FILE - A man reads a newspaper reporting on the summit between U.S. President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, at a newspaper stand in Seoul, South Korea, June 12, 2018.


Following the summit, Trump said sanctions would remain in place pending tangible progress on North Korea's denuclearization. Going into the summit, Pyongyang repeatedly rejected unilateral nuclear disarmament.

The move came as the United States and South Korea cancelled two more training exercises. "There is no longer a Nuclear Threat from North Korea", Trump wrote on Twitter June 13.

"That's OK. That's OK".

"If North Korea gives up the missile warheads or the ICBMs in the earlier stages, then I believe that U.N. Security Council will be able to adopt a resolution to relieve the sanctions or even partly abolish them", said Moon Chung-in, a special adviser to South Korean President Moon Jae-in.

"But we've seen this before, and that was words on a paper and promises made, so now we have to see action", he said.

But that future will be significantly influenced by China, which appeared to suggest to Trump this week that his new tariffs against Beijing could undermine USA goals on the Korean peninsula.

Trump said on Wednesday the remains of 200 American servicemen had already been sent back, following on from the agreement he reached with Kim in Singapore.

President Donald Trump declared Friday that North Korea still poses an "extraordinary threat" to the United States.

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