Government wins Brexit bill vote after concessions

Government wins Brexit bill vote after concessions

British Prime Minister Theresa May faces a showdown in parliament with lawmakers later on Tuesday who want a "meaningful vote" on an eventual Brexit deal and to set the government's "direction" if the house rejects the agreement.

The Prime Minister appeared to have defused a potentially explosive row over the EU customs union on Monday night as Tory pro-Europe rebels Sir Oliver Letwin and Nicky Morgan and Brexiteers Jacob Rees-Mogg and Sir Bill Cash came together to table a separate compromise amendment backing "a customs arrangement" with the EU.

"The Government's amendment today provides for a meaningful vote".

A statement from the Department for Exiting the European Union on Tuesday said David Davis had set three tests for any new amendment: not undermining the negotiations; not changing the constitutional role of parliament and government in negotiating global treaties; and respecting the referendum result.

Speaking at prime minister's questions, May said the government meant to bring forward its own amendment, but stressed that she could not allow MPs to bind the government's hands or to open it up to the risk that Brexit could be reversed.

She also repeated the defiant words spoken by David Davis from his days as a backbencher when he regularly rebelled against the government.


The government would not have sought a deal if it thought it had the votes to win, and they clearly blinked.

The EU published an explainer of its own backstop proposal in a bid to convince the United Kingdom government of its merits, but Theresa May has said it is not acceptable because it creates a regulatory border between Northern Ireland and the UK.

Morgan said if a compromise amendment did not emerge, rebels could work with the Lords to ensure the changes took place.

The government will face an nearly certain defeat if it now reneges on a promise to give MPs more of a say over the final Brexit deal. In the event that there was no Brexit agreement by November, it would require the Government to present a new plan and renew its negotiation mandate in Parliament.

Dr Lee said his main objection to Government policy was over the "wish to limit Parliament's role in contributing to the final outcome" and signalled he would rebel on the issue in the Commons later.

"So effectively we are going to reproduce the customs union and the single market and the Government will not be able to comply with Tuesday's legal obligation unless it does so". "There could be a confidence motion [in the prime minister] or an early general election". We'll have to wait and see.

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