Chopped romaine lettuce linked to E. coli outbreak

Chopped romaine lettuce linked to E. coli outbreak

The restaurants said they used bagged, chopped romaine lettuce to make the salads. Ninety-three percent of the patients interviewed said they ate romaine lettuce the week before they got sick.

The outbreak has sickened at least 35 people in 11 states, including 22 people who were hospitalized due to severe food poisoning.

The CDC and the US Food and Drug Administration are continuing to work with state and local health officials to further identify the source of the contaminated romaine.

Numerous cases so far were contracted from salad mixes used in restaurants, but some cases have been linked to bagged romaine purchased in stores. Most people reported eating a salad at a restaurant, and romaine lettuce was the only common ingredient identified among the salads eaten. Gieraltowski says the earlier outbreak was never conclusively linked to romaine (although Canadian investigators of the same outbreak issued a romaine recall based on their findings).


One Pennsylvania company, Fresh Foods Manufacturing, announced on Saturday a voluntary recall of 8,757 pounds of retail salad products. People in the previous outbreak were infected with a different DNA fingerprint of E. coli O157:H7 bacteria. If it is unclear from where the lettuce came from Yuma, do not purchase it, CDC suggested. There is no information to indicate that whole head romaine lettuce or hearts of romaine are involved in this outbreak.

Symptoms include bloody diarrhea, decreased urination or presence of blood in the urine, seizures, fatigue, bleeding from the nose and mouth, pallor, abdominal pain, vomiting, swelling, high blood pressure, and fever.

If you are purchasing romaine lettuce, or have bought some recently, ask the retailers where it is from.

Giant Eagle, Inc.is recalling multiple items prepared with romaine lettuce and sold in its Giant Eagle, Market District and GetGo locations across western Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia, Maryland and Indiana. Our lawyers represent clients and families of children sickened with bacterial infections in personal injury and wrongful death lawsuits against retailers, grocery stores, food processors, restaurants, daycare centers, schools, and others. What makes this E.coli strain particularly unsafe?

Related Articles