Sanctuary cities putting money in hands of cartels, Trump administration says

Sanctuary cities putting money in hands of cartels, Trump administration says

As CNN reports, Schwab accused Sessions and Acting Director Tom Homan of deliberately spreading misleading information after ICE slammed Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf's decision to warn the public about upcoming ICE raids.

Sanctuary cities are actually enticing more people to pay smugglers to help them make the unsafe trek north, not only putting people at risk but also enriching the smuggling cartels themselves, a senior administration official said Monday. Sessions, too, stated that ICE will have to pursue "800 wanted criminals" even harder, "all because of one mayor's irresponsible action".

Congress passed the laws deciding exactly how ICE operates, he said, and "if they don't like it, Nancy Pelosi and Dianne Feinstein can certainly change the law".

"I quit because I didn't want to perpetuate misleading facts", Schwab told the Chronicle.

ICE said while they disagreed with Schwab's take on the issue, they wished him well.

"Those are 800 wanted criminals that are now at large in that community - 800 wanted criminals that ICE will now have to pursue with more difficulty in more risky situations, all because of one mayor's irresponsible action", Sessions had said. He's threatened to arrest California politicians who were democratically elected and are lawfully and wisely exercising their power to protect public safety by refusing to cooperate with ICE.

The ICE agency confirmed Schwab's departure to the Chronicle, but did not provide a reason for his resignation citing confidential matters.

While most immigrants arrested by ICE in fiscal year 2017 were found to have criminal convictions, the most common criminal conviction among ICE arrestees was for driving under the influence of alcohol, with possession or distribution of "dangerous drugs" and other traffic offenses as the second and third most common convictions.


"I didn't feel like fabricating the truth to defend ourselves against (Schaaf's) actions was the way to go about it", he told the newspaper. I told them that the information was wrong, they asked me to deflect, and I didn't agree with that.

And just last week, in Sacramento, Sessions said, "Those are 800 wanted criminals that are now at large in that community - 800 wanted criminals that ICE will now have to pursue with more difficulty in more risky situations, all because of one mayor's irresponsible action". Schwab went on to tell an Oakland Fox affiliate that the operation was expected to arrest "far fewer" than the 232 suspected undocumented people it did.

Meanwhile, President Trump, who called Schaaf a disgrace during a campaign rally in Pennsylvania, said ICE was prepared to arrest "close to 1,000 people", but only got "a fraction" of that thanks to Schaaf. According to ICE, of the 232 people picked up, 115 had felonies or misdemeanors.

"Our democracy depends on public servants who act with integrity and hold transparency in the highest regard", she added.

Of the battle over how to properly characterize the events, Schwab said, "I've never been in this situation in 16, nearly 17 years in government where someone asked me to deflect when we absolutely knew something was awry - when the data was not correct".

Their claims were questioned by critics - and now by Schwab, a veteran public affairs officer who had worked at the Defense Department and NASA.

"I want to remind everybody that the L.A. operation we did last month, 88 percent of the people we arrested were convicted criminals", he told reporters on a conference call Monday night.

The president will visit California on Tuesday for the first time as president to inspect prototypes for his proposed border wall along the southern border.

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