1 dead on Mount Hood

1 dead on Mount Hood

A climber in a stretcher is lifted to a rescue helicopter on Mount Hood in Oregon, Feb. 13, 2018.

He reportedly slipped on ice, failed to self-arrest and tumbled about 700 to 1,000 feet in the mountain's Hogsback area, which is near the summit. One says, with the falling rock and ice, it felt like being in "a bowling alley".

Rescue teams are still working to reach those climbers. The stranded climbers were on the Hogsback Trail near the summit of the 11,240-foot mountain about 60 miles east of Portland. "But these were like dinner plates, hard ice dinner plates". Climbers obtain a wilderness permit and are encouraged to fill out a form listing their planned route, the equipment they have and contact information, but it's not mandatory and many don't do it, he said. The name and age of the victim were not immediately released. Officials said the peak is notorious for loose rocks in warm weather. The temperature was right around freezing at the spot where the climber fell, Gubele said. Chris Bernard of the 304th Rescue Squadron.

Another woman in Sumi's climbing group was seriously injured and was eventually roped down by rescuers.

Among the group, 32-year-old Kimberley Anderson of Beaverton, according to rescuers' reports, became unable to move and had to later be secured to a sled and transported down the mountain.

"It just stands there and calls to you - and during clear weather like we've had the past couple of days, that mountain is there calling to anyone who's ever thought about climbing it", said Mark Morford, spokesman for Portland Mountain Rescue.


"It was very hard to move under these types of conditions and she was very courageous and very stoic during her evacuation", he said of the woman who was rescued, adding that she was able to get out of the snow tractor under her own power.

Deputies said up to eight climbers remain stranded on the mountain and that one has injuries that are not believed to be life-threatening.

Wyatt Peck, 26, told the AP he started to go up the mountain Tuesday, but turned around.

"It was very hard to move under these types of conditions and she was very courageous and very stoic during her evacuation", he said of the woman who was rescued, adding that she was able to get out of the snow tractor under her own power.

Peck said others in his climbing group continued, and he's concerned that they are among those stranded. "I think they just got to the summit and were so exhausted they didn't know what to do to get back down - and that's the hardest part, to get back down". Mountaineering clubs offer training, but there are no requirements for scaling the peak, she said.

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