European Commission to haul Czech, Hungary, Poland before court over refugee sharing

European Commission to haul Czech, Hungary, Poland before court over refugee sharing

But the Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland have taken in nearly none in two years.

Under the European Union law, the Commission has the power to take legal action against a member state which is not respecting its obligations.

They will be referred to the European Court of Justice for "non-compliance with their legal obligations on relocation", the commission said in a statement, referring to the three countries' staunch refusal to take part in an EU scheme forcing migrants on unwilling nations.

The EU took Hungary to the bloc's top court on Thursday over a crackdown on education and foreign-backed civil society groups that critics say targets U.S. billionaire George Soros.

The Commission has launched legal action against the three member states earlier this year, sending them a "Letter of Formal Notice" in June and a "Reasoned Opinion" in July.

"The replies received were again found not satisfactory and three countries have given no indication that they will contribute to the implementation of the relocation decision".


Passed at the height of the migrant crisis in 2015, the controversial rule dictates that asylum seekers who illegally breach Europe's borders be "fairly" redistributed across the bloc through a quota system.

Hungary's right-wing government is looking to pass a higher education law that could close the Central European University, founded by financier and philanthropist George Soros.

Referral to the CJEU is the third step in the infringement procedure, coming the same day as the EC also announced it had referred Hungary to the court in separate infringement proceedings related to amendments to the country's Higher Education Law and legislation on foreign-funded NGOs.

The commission said Hungary's education law "disproportionally restricts European Union and non-EU universities in their operations and needs to be brought back in line with European Union law".

In a separate statement, the commission said that the laws on foreign non-governmental organisations "indirectly discriminate and disproportionately restrict donations from overseas to civil society organisations".

Related Articles