GOP Senators Tweet Trump in Support of McConnell

GOP Senators Tweet Trump in Support of McConnell

About 60 percent of people says that Trump and congressional Republicans are responsible for any problems with the health law. Fifty-two percent of Republicans said they want President Trump to make the ACA work. Insurers have cited the uncertainty around health insurance markets caused by the Republican push for historically unpopular repeal legislation as one factor hurting them, along with Trump's threats to pause government payments to exchanges.

This finding and others from the poll suggest that most of the public is ready for Washington to move beyond the repeal-and-replace debate and instead focus on fixing shortcomings in the Affordable Care Act.

If Trump breaks Obamacare through sabotage, he will own the consequences. And equal shares of respondents (21%) said they want the GOP to continue working on its own replacement bill or to abandon their efforts altogether. For a White House that often seems more concerned with cementing support from Trump's loyalists than embracing the political center, that might help explain Trump's persistence on the issue. Trump wants to move on to tax reform and infrastructure but the Affordable Healthcare Act, an imploding law that Republicans can not fix and will not repeal, stands in the way. If Trump continues to mess with Obamacare, as this poll illustrates, Republicans will pay a heavy price in 2018. Just 39 percent of Americans now view the law unfavorably, compared to 44 percent last month.

When asked about the Senate's failure to pass a repeal-and-replace bill, most Americans (60%) say it is a "good thing", while about a third (35%) say it is a "bad thing". Favorable views have increased 9 percentage points since the 2016 presidential election, with the trend occurring among Democrats, independents, and Republicans. The Republican Party's slim majority in the Senate allows for no dissent, and it took just seven undocumented Democrats within the GOP ranks to scuttle the last attempt at full repeal.


Americans' support for the Affordable Care Act is growing, according to a new survey by the Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF). Premiums could jump as high as 49 percent.

In fact, says the report, the majority of Americans think that health insurance companies charging higher premiums in certain marketplaces will have a negative impact on them and their family, while fewer (31 percent) say it will have no impact.

The survey was conducted between August 1 and 6 and has a margin of error of plus or minus three percentage points.

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